2016 CCCC Doctoral Consortium Agenda

Consortium of Doctoral Programs in Rhetoric and Composition

Agenda for Wednesday, April 6, 2016

Conference on College Composition and Communication

GRB Convention Center, Room 351B, Level Three

 1:30 – 1:40      Welcome and Introductions

1:40 – 3:40      Program: Panel Presentation and Discussion

  • Kevin Eric DePew, Old Dominion University

“Meeting Our Students Where They Are At”

  • Tyler Branson, University of California, Santa Barbara

“Doing What We Know How To Do, Only Better: Investigating the Rhet/Comp Graduate Curriculum in the Age of ‘Adjunctification’”

  • Rebekah Shultz Colby and Richard Colby, University of Denver

“Advice for Succeeding as an Academic Couple within a Writing Program with Teaching Tenure”

“The Best Job You Never Knew You Wanted”

  • Susan Naomi Bernstein, Mark A. Hannah, Dawn Opel, Shirley Rose, Arizona State University

“Preparation for 21st-Century Knowledge Enterprises: Alternatives for ASU Graduate Students”

4:00 – 5:00      Business Meeting

  • Brief reports
  • Archival Updates: Kris Blair
  • Assessment Planning: Carrie Leverenz
  • Treasury Updates: Kris Blair
  • Reports: TBA
  • Consortium Leadership Transition: Kris Blair, Amy Kimme Hea
  • At-Large Member Nominations/Elections Process: In even-numbered years, elections take place after CCCC for two At-Large members
  • Theme for 2017 Consortium Meeting and CCCC Panel
  • Other Agenda Items from the Floor
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2016 CCCC Doctoral Consortium Meeting

The Consortium of Doctoral Programs in Rhetoric and Composition invites you to attend our annual session and open business meeting at the CCCCs in Houston:

Wednesday, April 6, 1:30-5:00 p.m., ROOM TBA

We hope you will join us and share this invitation with faculty colleagues and graduate students!

Our session begins with a rich variety of speakers on the general topic of preparation for diverse career paths:

1. Kevin Eric DePew, Old Dominion University

“Meeting Our Students Where They Are At”

Old Dominion University’s online English PhD has attracted students who already have careers below the tenure-track level at four-year and two-year institutions. Many students come to this interdisciplinary program seeking guidance to intellectualize the work they are already doing in the classroom. While many students’ goals are not tenure-track positions at four-year institutions, they also want to learn how to contribute to various scholarly conversations in writing studies, literary studies, and/or the digital humanities. After describing the relatively new program, Kevin will explain how its design has been increasingly responding to constituent needs.

Bio: Kevin Eric DePew has been the graduate program director of the English PhD at Old Dominion University’s (OWI) for five years. This unique doctoral program brings students around the nation together in online synchronous video seminars. He has also co-edited Foundational Practices of Online Writing Instruction with Beth Hewett and is co-designing the OWI infrastructure for ODU’s English Composition program with Mary Beth Pennington. Kevin will be assuming the position of Assistant Chair of the Consortium of Doctoral Programs in Rhetoric and Composition this year.

2. Tyler Branson, University of California, Santa Barbara

“Doing What We Know How To Do, Only Better: Investigating the Rhet/Comp Graduate Curriculum in the Age of ‘Adjunctification’”

In this talk I reflect briefly on my experiences on the 2015 academic job market in Rhetoric and Composition. Having secured a desirable non tenure track position with job security and competitive benefits, one might presume I have unique insight into how the field can revise graduate programs to prepare more students for multiple, flexible career paths. However, I suggest that one possible approach is not necessarily to deemphasize the allure of the tenure track, but to reemphasize the qualities of a valuable graduate education in rhetoric and composition, which include intensive mentorship, hands-on experiences, and space for meaningful collaboration.

Bio: Tyler Branson applied to over 100 jobs in 2015. He is currently a Lecturer in the Writing Program at the University of California Santa Barbara, where he teaches lower- and upper-division courses in writing and rhetoric, including first-year writing, writing for public discourse, and writing for business and administration. His research focuses primarily on the practice of rhetoric and writing in public contexts. He has related interests in civic engagement, histories of rhetoric and composition, and writing pedagogy. He is currently working on a book project focusing on the role of what he calls problematic partnerships in the field of Writing Studies.

3a. Rebekah Shultz Colby, University of Denver

“Advice for Succeeding as an Academic Couple within a Writing Program with Teaching Tenure”

I offer advice to graduate students in rhetoric and composition for succeeding within a writing program with lecture or teaching tenure positions. I advise them to treat the position like a tenure track with some key differences: actively pursue an individual research agenda but do it in a way that also promotes the program, be able to work effectively with faculty from diverse educational backgrounds, be prepared to do campus outreach, and, last but not least, work to make the position and program align with larger goals within the field of rhetoric and composition as a whole. Finally, I offer advice for negotiating spousal hires and working productively as an academic couple.

Bio: Rebekah Shultz Colby teaches in the University of Denver Writing Program where she teaches courses that use games to teach rhetoric and disciplinary writing. She co-edited the collection Rhetoric/Composition/Play through Video Games and a special issue of the journal Computers and Composition Online on gaming and composition. Also with Richard Colby, she co-authored an article about using World of Warcraft to teach disciplinary research writing for Computers and Composition and has written an article about how gaming pedagogy impacts female students for Computers and Composition Online.

3b. Richard Colby, University of Denver

“The Best Job You Never Knew You Wanted”

Richard Colby will offer a brief overview of the post-tenure world and navigating the profession as an academic couple. He will discuss how non-tenure-track positions in composition can help the field as a whole as they refocus research and pedagogical attention on undergraduate writing, but in so doing, ask us to reconsider how we prepare graduate students for the field. Colby will also discuss the pitfalls of such positions such as the morass of service expectations and the lack of research incentives. He will end with recommendations including a new graduate course in service related work.

Bio: Richard Colby teaches in and is the Assistant Director of the award winning University of Denver Writing Program. He co-edited the collection Rhetoric/Composition/Play through Video Games and a special issue of the journal Computers and Composition Online on gaming and composition. His work on using games in teaching has been published in Computers and Composition and Computers and Composition Online. He teaches courses on the rhetoric of games and disciplinary research.

4a. Susan Naomi Bernstein, Arizona State University
4b. Mark A. Hannah, Arizona State University
4c. Dawn Opel, ASU Rhetoric and Composition Ph.D. 2015
4d. Shirley Rose, Arizona State University

“Preparation for 21st-Century Knowledge Enterprises: Alternatives for ASU Graduate Students”

Arizona State University offers PhD students preparation for work in a variety of 21st Century knowledge-making enterprises. Our presentation addresses support for a wide range of post-graduate aspirations, including 1) a practicum in teaching basic writing that prepares students for teaching in community colleges and literacy programs, and practica in teaching professional writing and second language writing; 2) options for dissertations besides the traditional long monograph 3) workshops on “Alt-Ac” careers that introduce alternatives to traditional tenure-track careers. We discuss resulting challenges to usual practices of recruiting students, designing coursework, and measuring progress toward the degree.

Bios:
Susan Naomi Bernstein is a Lecturer and Co-Coordinator of the Stretch Writing Program in ASU Writing Programs in the Department of English on the Tempe campus of Arizona State University. She teaches at an American Indian Community in central Arizona, as well as the Teaching Basic Writing Practicum and Stretch courses at Tempe campus. Her most recent publication is “Occupy Basic Writing: Pedagogy in the Wake of Austerity” in Nancy Welch and Tony Scott’s recently published collection, Composition in the Age of Austerity. She has published four editions of Teaching Developmental Writing (Bedford St. Martin’s Professional Resources) and is a regular contributor on basic writing issues for the Bedford Bits blog.

Mark A. Hannah is an Assistant Professor of English at Arizona State University. Along with undergraduate professional writing courses, he teaches a graduate course in the theory of professional writing and a practicum in teaching professional writing. Currently, he is a co-investigator on two National Science Foundation grants, Cross-disciplinary Education in Social & Ethical Aspects of Nanotechnology and The Dynamics of Earth System Oxygenation. His recent publications have appeared in College Composition and Communication, Business and Professional Communication Quarterly, International Journal of Business Communication, Connexions International Professional Communication Journal, and chapters in edited collections.

Dawn Opel earned her PhD in Rhetoric, Composition, and Linguistics at Arizona State University in 2015. Her dissertation is a medical and digital humanities project on the design of the technical communication of the home pregnancy test in the United States. She is currently a postdoctoral fellow in computational humanities and data science with the Institute for Humanities Research Nexus Lab and Computational Innovation Group at Arizona State University.

Shirley Rose is Professor of English and Director of ASU Writing Programs. She regularly teaches graduate courses in Writing Program Administration and Archival Research Methods. Her publications include three collections on writing program administration research and theory, co-edited with Irwin Weiser, and numerous articles and chapters on writing teacher preparation and issues in the professionalization of graduate students in rhetoric and composition. She is Director of the WPA Consultant-Evaluator Service.

In addition, the Consortium also has a sponsored session on the general program. This session is scheduled for Thursday, April 7, from 12:15-1:30 p.m., and is titled “Enacting Career Diversity in Rhetoric and Composition: Different Pathways for a Professional Life with a PhD in Rhetoric and Composition.” The session features Anita Furtner Archer from Raytheon, Joanna Schmidt from Texas Christian University, Ruijie Zhao from Parkland College, and Amy Kimme Hea from the University of Arizona as respondent.

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Consortium Meeting Panel Presentations Available

The presentations from our CCCCs Consortium Meeting are available, in case you weren’t able to attend or wanted to review the data from our three presenters:

  • Benjamin Miller, CUNY Graduate Center
    Title: “Beyond Elevator Stories: Scaling Up Our Knowledge of Comp/Rhet Dissertations”  
    Link to Presentation
  • Carrie Leverenz, Texas Christian University
    Title: “Telling It Like It Is, But How Is It?: The Job Market for Rhet/Comp PhDs”
    Link to Presentation
    Link to Notes
  • Jim Ridolfo, University of Kentucky
    Title: “Lessons from Rhetmap: Mapping the Rhetoric and Composition Job Market from 2012-2015”
    Link to Presentation
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2015 Consortium Meeting Agenda

Consortium of Doctoral Programs in Rhetoric and Composition
Agenda for Wednesday, March 18, 2015
Conference on College Composition and Communication
Convention Center, Tampa CC, Room 16, First Floor

1:30 – 1:45 Welcome and Introductions

1:45 – 3:30 Program: Panel Presentation and Breakout Session

  • Benjamin Miller, CUNY Graduate Center
    Title: “Beyond Elevator Stories: Scaling Up Our Knowledge of Comp/Rhet Dissertations”
  • Carrie Leverenz, Texas Christian University
    Title: “Telling It Like It Is, But How Is It?: The Job Market for Rhet/Comp PhDs”
  • Jim Ridolfo, University of Kentucky
    Title: “Lessons from Rhetmap: Mapping the Rhetoric and Composition Job Market from 2012-2015”

3:45 – 5:00 Business Meeting

Brief reports

  1. Website and Listserv Migration: Kris Blair/Craig Olsen
  • Treasury Updates: Kris Blair for Helen Foster
  • Visibility Project Liaison: Louise Phelps
  • Archival Planning: Kris Blair for Janice Lauer
  • Assistant Chair Nominations/Elections Process: In odd-numbered years, elections take place after CCCC for the position of Assistant Chair
  • Other Executive Committee Vacancies for 2015
  •  Future Assessment Initiatives
  • Theme for 2016 Consortium Meeting and CCCC Panel
  • New Business/Other Agenda Items
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Consortium CCCC’s Meeting 2015

On behalf of the Executive Committee of the Consortium of Doctoral Programs in Rhetoric and Composition, I invite you to attend our annual session and business meeting at the CCCCs:

Wednesday, March 18, 1:30-5:00 p.m., Convention Center, Tampa CC, Room 16, First Floor

We hope you will join us and share this invitation with faculty colleagues and graduate students; we also hope you will plan to send a representative from your program to attend.
This year’s Consortium meeting will feature a panel presentation and breakout session titled “Mapping the Profession.” The session is designed to foreground current trends and future trajectories in the rhetoric and composition job market. These include the increasing number of non-tenure track positions, current data about job market placement, the types of research being undertaken by graduate students, and the overall need to reconsider the ways we prepare future graduates for a broader range of academic and non-academic career paths. After a series of short presentations, the interactive dialogue will focus on key questions for ongoing data collection and assessment of the collective success in preparing graduates for the changing dynamics of the profession in the 21st-century. Below is information about our impressive lineup of speakers:

Speaker 1: Benjamin Miller, CUNY Graduate Center
Title: “Beyond Elevator Stories: Scaling Up Our Knowledge of Comp/Rhet Dissertations”

Abstract: This presentation will report on a study of roughly 2,700 doctoral dissertations (completed in 2001-2010) tagged by their authors as studying “language, rhetoric and composition,” in order to get a handle on graduate students’ uptake of methods and subjects in pursuing the PhD. Brief consideration will be given to overall method frequency; method correlations within individual dissertations; and the distribution of topics, as determined by an LDA topic modeling approach. Choosing a major research project like a dissertation involves a delicate balance between ambition and completion, between the obscure and the already known. Through this study, I hope to provide a better sense of what is common and rare in doctoral research in Composition/Rhetoric.

Bio: Benjamin Miller is a PhD candidate at the Graduate Center, CUNY, an Instructional Technology Fellow at CUNY’s Macaulay Honors College, and an editor of the Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy. He received a CCCC Chairs’ Memorial Scholarship in 2012, in part for his work on the Writing Studies Tree, a crowdsourced database of academic genealogies in composition, rhetoric, and related fields. Ben has taught writing at Columbia University and ‘Hunter College, CUNY. An article stemming from his dissertation research on dissertations was published in CCC in September 2014.

Speaker 2: Carrie Leverenz, Texas Christian University
Title: “Telling It Like It Is, But How Is It?: The Job Market for Rhet/Comp PhDs”

Abstract: In this presentation, I will report on the first year of a three-year survey of the job search experiences of Rhet/Comp PhD students. Published reports about the job market in English continue to offer dire warnings about the dearth of tenure-track positions, but few of those reports consider both the number of positions and the number of applicants in specific specializations. While Rhet/Comp job candidates continue to fare better than their peers in literary studies, we as a field rely primarily on anecdotal evidence or the experience of recent graduates when advising students about the job market. The purpose of this three-year study is to document the strength of the job market in Rhet/Comp and to describe whether and how it might be changing.

Bio: Carrie Leverenz is Associate Professor of English and Director of the Institute for Critical and Creative Expression at TCU, where she served as Director of Composition from 2000-2006 and as Director of the New Media Writing Studio from 2006-2010. Her research focuses on writing program administration and computers and writing, with special attention to cultural difference. With Amy Goodburn and Donna LeCourt, she co-edited Rewriting Success in Rhetoric and Composition Careers (Parlor Press, 2012). Most recently, she has published work investigating the relevance of research in design studies for the teaching of writing. Her next project involves reclaiming writing about teaching as a valid and valued means of knowledge-making in Rhetoric and Composition.

Speaker 3: Jim Ridolfo, University of Kentucky
Title: “Lessons from Rhetmap: Mapping the Rhetoric and Composition Job Market from 2012-2015”

Abstract: In this presentation, I discuss how rhetmap.org has developed over the last three years to include information about doctoral programs, the job market past and present, and other mapable field data. I will provide an overview of job market trends, rhetmap.org usage data, and point to future directions for field research. I argue that rhetmap.org as an engaged digital humanities project serves as a catalyst for enabling other kinds of work and reforms such as making the past and present job market more transparent to prospective doctoral students, and that this work can be taken even further by greater program-sourcing and visualization of rhetoric and composition doctoral data and placement information.

Bio: Jim Ridolfo (Ph.D 2009 in Rhetoric and Writing, Michigan State University) is Assistant Professor of Writing, Rhetoric, and Digital Studies at the University of Kentucky. His books include The Available Means of Persuasion: Mapping a Theory and Pedagogy of Multimodal Public Rhetoric (with David Sheridan and Anthony Michel, Parlor Press, 2012), Rhetoric and the Digital Humanities (co-edited with William Hart-Davidson, University of Chicago Press, 2014) and Digital Samaritans: Rhetorical Delivery and Engagement in the Digital Humanities (forthcoming from University of Michigan Press in 2015). Ridolfo is a recipient of a 2012 Middle East and North Africa Regional Research Fulbright, and is the recipient of the 2014 Richard Ohmann Award for Outstanding Article in College English.

In addition, the Consortium is sponsoring a roundtable session on Thursday, March 19, 3:15-4:30 p.m., Convention Center, Tampa CC, Room 11, First Floor (Session D.14): “Mapping the Future of Doctoral Programs in Rhetoric and Composition,” featuring Carrie Leverenz, Texas Christian University; Kelli Cargile-Cook, Texas Tech University; Jean Ferguson Carr, University of Pittsburgh; Mara Holt, Ohio University; Malea Powell, Michigan State University; and Shirley Rose, Arizona State University.

Thanks so much. We look forward to seeing you at these sessions.

Dr. Kristine Blair

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Welcome to the Consortium of Doctoral Programs in Rhetoric and Composition Website

The Consortium of Doctoral Programs in Rhetoric and Composition, founded in 1993, is a research-oriented coalition of Ph.D. programs in Rhetoric and Composition that meets as a Special Event on Wednesday at the annual Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC). Universities with doctoral studies in Rhetoric and Composition, including independent degrees, concentrations, tracks, and interdisciplinary configurations for advanced study, are invited to join and to name representatives. The Consortium also welcomes and provides support for those planning new doctoral programs. It maintains a listserv for program representatives.

The Consortium pursues activities and projects intended to support and foster communication and collaboration among doctoral programs, faculty, and graduate students in Rhetoric and Composition. Relatedly, it seeks to enhance research capabilities, dissemination of scholarly work, and visibility for the work of scholars in Rhetoric and Composition and for the field as a research discipline. The Consortium hopes to network its activities with professional organizations, policy makers in higher education, funding agencies, and other groups. See the links in the menu above for further information.

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